Simpler lifestyle better for women

A lifestyle that features fresh foods and limited use of products likely to contain environmental chemicals has been shown to reduce exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), such as BPA and phthalates.

EDCs are linked to a number of adverse health complications including neuro-developmental delays, behavioral issues and fertility problems.

They are produced by the millions of pounds per year and found extensively in a range of products that contain certain plastics.

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry examined individual behavioral choices and community lifestyle practices, as well as analyzed urine samples, from a group of Old Order Mennonite (OOM) women in mid-pregnancy and determined that they have lower levels EDCs in their systems than the general population. The study was published in the journal NeuroToxicology.

Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates are part of a group of chemicals known as endocrine disruptors, chemicals in plastic that interfere with the body’s endocrine, or hormone, system. They are used at length in a range of products, including clothing, furniture, cosmetics, and medical supplies and are also commonly found in food, water, and dust. EDC exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation and absorption through the skin.

In addition to neuro-developmental delays, behavioral issues and fertility problems, exposure to BPA and phthalates have been linked to reproductive tract changes, neuro-developmental delays, behavioral issues, obesity, asthma, allergies, fertility problems and heart disease. The effects of EDCs appear to be greatest for the fetus exposed during gestation.

“Bisphenol A and phthalates have been linked to a number of adverse health effects, but because these chemicals are so pervasive in the environment, and we all carry their signatures in our bodies, it’s difficult to explicitly identify environmental sources and pathways,” said Shanna H. Swan, PhD, Professor of Preventive Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and lead author of the study. “The Mennonite community provides us with a natural comparison group because they eat mostly fresh, unprocessed foods, farms without pesticides, applies no cosmetics, and uses personal care products sparingly.”

I am sure atleast women of child-bearing age should practice following 2 steps for a better lifestyle:

– eat mostly fresh, unprocessed foods, farms without pesticides,
– applies no cosmetics, and uses personal care products sparingly

Enjoy Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates free lifestyle.

Dr. Anil Singhal, MD (Homeo)

Simpler lifestyle better for women
by ( Author at Dr. Anil Singhal MD (Homeo) )
Posted on at 5:57 am.
Last updated on August 8th, 2012 at 8:47 am.
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